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and the last day on tuesday >>> we've seen break throughs in science and john has the top ten science stories at 2010 >> a revolutionary light called litro. >> this will change how we take and experience pictures. >> the camera captures the light field, allowing focus to be changed after it has been taken. no. 9, nasa space craft sent data about an asteroid. it appears vesta went through planet evolution and it's one of a kind. to be one of e only one that's left. >> no. 8, you may have heard the term god pardon cal. the european nuclear center claims to have found it. why is it a ci,]w:qbig deal? think big bang theory. >> in this particle, this set off the explosion that creates the universe. >> after analyzing data generated by an accelerator. >> at 7, a leap of faith. record breaking jump. bub broke the free fall record jumping from 128,000 feet in a space suit. >> i said the whole world is watching and i wish the world could see. cambodiag5a[([ and a package cac 71 was aggressive. he was there when the mystery was solved. >> those organizism and them getting steroids. >> no. 5, space was
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opp
the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus
, science changes. nothing is more worthless than a science textbook from the '50s. >> the word shouldn't change from the original constitution, surely. >> my words aren't based on the constitution. >> i get that, but what it is is about fairness and equality. i went to see "lincoln" the movie a few weeks ago. it was a riveting movie. daniel day-lewis was great as lincoln. it was all about how he fought in his last few months as president to get slavery abolished. there were millions of americans who thought slavery was acceptable who were outraged at what he was doing. he was not trying to make something popular for the moment. he knew instinctively it was just wrong, unfair, unequal. >> and why did he know that? because it's in the bible. >> but we -- >> it's in the bible. he was building it on biblical truth. the bible says that every man should be free. >> right, but you don't think every man should be free and equal. >> no -- of course we're free. and of course we're equal. >> what does that mean? >> you can love anybody you want to. >> but you don't think a gay man or woman should
there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not. i post on comment sections on websites often. here it is. the cost of racial discrimination in admissions. it is personally unfair. it passes over better qualified students. disturbing legal and moral precedent and allowing racial discrimination. it creates resentment. it stigmatizes the so-called beneficiaries in the eyes of
have to do is look at what works. this is not rocket science. i came to washington as a novice in politics, believing in the power of ideas, seeing how ideas can revolutionize different industries, can create new products and services meeting the needs of customers everywhere. and that's what i hoped we could do here in washington. maybe naively i went to work in the house, often working with the heritage foundation to create a better product here in washington. i saw social security, and not many people look below the surface, but we knew it was going broke. we knew we were taking in money that people were paying for this social security retirement benefit, but we were spending it all. and i thought, what an opportunity it would be for future generations, for my children, if we actually saved what people were putting into social security for their retirement. and you didn't have to do too much math to see that even for middle-class workers that americans could be millionaires when they retired if we even kept half of what was put into social security for them. it seemed like a
. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, including one in western new york, where an attacker lay in wait for a fire crew. >> responding firefighters when they pulled up on the scene started receiving -- were fired upon. >> police speaking shortly after a home and car erupted in flames. it was arson they said later that turned out to be an ambush. >> it does appear that it was a trap that was set. for responding first responders. >> gunmen killed two volunteer firefighters and wounded two others then killed himself. police identified him as william sp
on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> i am at m shapiro. wholesales rose it of members to the highest level more than two years. sales were up 15% from the same time last year. mortgage rates finished out but the average for the 30 year fixed average was up three point* 3%. after four years on the job the epa's administrator jackson is resigning expecting to leave after the "state of the union" address in january. sea world entertainment filing for the ipo coming three years after the orlando based operator was acquired by blackstone group at 2.5 billion dollars. they purchased them from anheuser-busch and as. this is the latest from fox business, giving you the power to prosper. >> russia hosting peace talks to end the civil unrest over 20 months. will they encourage president aside to step down? let's go to our correspondent from jerusalem. >> so far the russians have said they will not encourage aside to step down but it must be solved from dialogue. and he said he felt syria could go into a bloody mess but some fe
the epa. inhof of the science committee issued a report back in october where he said the obama administration not just the epa but several agencies are working to find way to regulate the hydraulic fracturing at the federal level to stop the practice altogether. irony is fracking is one thing in the environmental -- excuse me, manufacturing sector that lifted up the economy. to the point it's not talked about exporting liquid natural gas. >> hypocrisy of the idealogue on the left. in the past coal was a big offender. they wanted to kill coal, which the epa has done. natural gas is wond evidenceful because it emit that was carbon. now coal is abolished we don't have new plans and now they are going after the natural gas. supposed to be benign. if you say it's a pendulum, it's not. ratchet. it expands. republicans can shrink it in the future you be in the end, it's inforrable and it grows. >> thank you. stay tuned for president's >>
. but it is a poor idea. >> reporter: it is set for january 15. johnhealth and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> we know the name of a man who was hit and killed while walking his dog yesterday. he is thomas willy. he was walking his dog yesterday morning when he was struck by a vehicle that kept going. he died later at the hospital, his dog was also killed. no arrests have been made. >>> we are on storm watch right now and through the weekend. right now you can see the coverage out there. rain heavy at times. that has been the case. rain showers, scattered in the east bay, parts of the north bay, especially with the darker shades of greens and the yellow. south of fairfield, a third of an inch an hour. we will show you this around daily city in san francisco, approaching ocean beach as well. you will notice light to moderate cells towards the sunset district, and north bay, mill valley, still scattered showers, down pours as well. into the weekend, this is just the beginning. two storms we are tracking. first one tomorrow morning, 5:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., strongest rain. sun
have more gun violence. >> reporter: but a 2004 report by the national academy of science found that guns likely to be used in crimes were unlikely to be turned in at gun buybacks. the mayor says since 2009, los angeles has collected 8,000 guns at buybacks, a period in which violent crime in the city has dropped by 33%. >> this is part of a much bigger effort, a comprehensive effort to address gun and gang violence. and like i said, in the city of l.a., the proof is in the pudding. >> reporter: the line of cars stretched for six blocks as people waited up to three hours to turn in their guns. >> me turning my rifles in now is my sympathy card to connecticut. >> reporter: so many people are bringing their guns in here that l.a.p.d. officials say this is likely to be their most successful buyback ever. they expect to collect more than 2,500 guns before it's over. >> axelrod: john blackstone in los angeles, thank you. a sad sight here in new york today in a place that's seen its share of trouble lately. an endangered finback whale washed up alive on the beach oh the breezy point se
leukemia. does that make a more uncertain morence? >> not only a more uncertain scie science, we actually lose ten uncrs. en reporter: and the down side of turning off a variety of experiments is what? >> we've killed innovation because the most innovative becaus projects are the projects that will go first. >> reporter: the pending budget cuts have also forced labs to etow down the hiring of promising younger scientists. >> turning them down because i have to say to them "in all honesty, i don't know whether i can take you on. on that four to five-year commitment." >> reporter: the n.i.h. hopes to restore the lost 10% if the ifncy's funding is restored, but this is one danger from the anscal cliff that isn't waiting for new year's day. the reduction in medical experiments and the hold on ingoratory jobs is happening now. wyatt andrews, cbs news, wy washington. ghanlor: in afghanistan, another insider attacked today and for inside first tt time the attacker was ackefghan woman. a police sergeant. she shot and killed an american contractor inside a compound in rabul that houses police head
for january 15. johnhealth and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> we know the name of a man who was hit and killed while walking his dog yesterday. he is thomas willy. he was walking his dog yesterday morning when he was struck by a vehicle that kept going. he died later at the hospital, his dog was also killed. no arrests have been made. >>> we are on storm watch right now and through the weekend. right now you can see the coverage out there. rain heavy at times. that has been the case. rain showers, scattered in the east bay, parts of the north bay, especially with the darker shades of greens and the yellow. south of fairfield, a third of an inch an hour. we will show you this around daily city in san francisco, approaching ocean beach as well. you will notice light to moderate cells towards the sunset district, and north bay, mill valley, still scattered showers, down pours as well. into the weekend, this is just the beginning. two storms we are tracking. first one tomorrow morning, 5:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., strongest rain. sunday, this will pack a punch with rainfall and
and they go up to 30 days. some say they never return gifts but they have that technique down to a science. >> they will exchange it or they usually give you a store credit if i don't want it. >> other people say instead of trading something they don't want give it to charity. >>> these are pictures of the dolphin after her send off in the marine islands. she was found mall your rushed and with a bite mark on her neck last month. she was transferred where after many weeks of treatment she was nursed back toth. >>> a dog became an international sensation. this dog appears to have beaten cancer but she needs more treatment for heart worm before her face wound can be closed. she lost her snout when she threw herself in front of a motorcycle to save two young girls in the philippines. i understand it is very shrill are you so give yourself some extra time because we are going slowly. you can traffic there, they are the headlights as you head towards northbound in santa clara and in fremont you can see the same story, it is definitely wet thought but traffic seems to be moving along quite nicel
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. both of us actually. our pharmacist recommended it. and that makes me feel pretty good about it. and then i heard about a study looking at multivitamins and the long term health benefits. and what do you know? they used centrum silver in the study. makes me feel even better, that's what i take. sorry, we take. [ male announcer ] centrum. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. centrum, always your most complete. with olay, here's how. new regenerist eye and lash duo the cream smooths the look of lids... softens the look of lines. the serum instantly thickens the look of lashes. see wow!... eyes in just one week with olay. >>> we're going to turn now to our "instant index" on a thursday night. shoppers at a shanghai mall suddenly swimming with the sharks. a massive aquarium burst there. here's the video going viral tonight. right here, a flash, the glass gives out. shoppers washed away. three sharks were scattered, 15 shoppers injured by th
reported in the history of science. the last ten years goes down as the hottest ten years recorded in the history of science and that means more wacky weather, more moisture, more energy. global warming is a misnomer. it should be called global swing. >> which means the world doesn't end tomorrow. it's just every little event is worse or inkre meantycrementally worse than before. >> you look at all the glaciers are receding. the ice caps has diminished by 50% just in the last 50 years. an area the size of united states in terms of ice disappeared this year over the polar ice caps. the seasons are changing. summer is longer winter is shorter, tropical diseases are moving north. all the indicators show that the earth is warming up and that's what's driving some of this wacky weather. >> duh that show more or could we snap back? >> get used to it. we could be experiencing more 100-year flooding storms, hurricanes because there's more energy circumstance lating. we could argue how much human activity is driving it but everybody agrees the earth is heating up ther
is something. >> we can get more of these. >> it's down to a science now. >> can we do this. >> 34. >> 25 now. >> a girl would be happy with a pink monkey. >> we keep track of them by age, by year. >> two, one, yay. >> the gifts we give out are from infants to 13 years old. last year we probably had 15 carts loaded up with gifts. you people are so awesome we really appreciate this. >> the kids just love meeting santa. >> he's so excited to meet santa claus right now. >> come meet santa. >> hohoho, merry christmas. >> the family gets their picture taken with santa. >> big smiles, there you go. >> merry christmas. >> are you going to ask me what i want for christmas. >> what do you want for christmas? >> a monster truck, a real one. >> we have probably about 500 children. >> we started out with five right now. >> my grandma is a go getter. she just loves what she does and she's so good at it. it's just part of her personality that's how it's gotten where it's reached where it has. >> good job pedro. >> thank you. >> we came out here the first year to do santa and i don't know it just grew on us
and science editor john fowler ktvu news. >>> rescue crews spent the evening rescuing a horse. cracky the horse climbed up to the loft looking for more hay. he was stuck up there for three days. the horse is in good shape. >> officials at u.s. airways are looking into what caused one of it aircrafts to catch fire. it happened during maintenance check. the fire started in a small motor under the plane's trail. no one was aboard at the time. the plane was scheduled to fly to vancouver. passengers were put on another airplane craft two hours later. >>> there's word that mcafee is spending christmas in england. the pioneer wrote that he's safe in the country where he grew up. mcafee was born in england. the sun reports mcafee is hoping for a fresh start. mcafee has been in hiding from authorities in belize where he had been living. he is wanted for questioning in the death -- for the suspicious death of a neighbor. >>> ktvu's robert handa followed the mail carriers on their rout today. >> reporter: it's not exactly santa's sleigh but some san jose postal carriers including nancy ray hit
the way scientists test new medicines all at the same time. health and science reporter carolyn johnson explains. >> the doctor believes she's zebra fish to light the way to major drug discoveries. >> the big breakthrough was to use the firefly protein which gives a strong light signal. >> he and his colleagues are part of an international team that's using the zebra fish to screen potential treatments for conditions ranging from obesity to diabetes. they have attached a genetic light switch to a pathway associated the production of glucose or blood sugar. >> meaning when the fish produce glucose in the liver, the light shines up. >>> the result is a fish that can be used as a living, swimming litmus test. the green flow seen in this video is not only visible to researchers, it's also measurable. a brighter lights indicates a higher level of glucose, used as a barometer in research. as one study they zeroed in a potential obesity drug after screening nearly 2500 candidates using the genetically modified fish. >> we put three fish in and add the drug compounds like one per well so we can
gate, that's it. >> reporter: we saw this open topsighted seeing bus. health and science editor john fowler ktvu news. >>> rescue crews spent the evening rescuing a horse. cracky the horse climbed up to the loft looking for more hay. he was stuck up there for three days. the horse is in good shape. >> officials at u.s. airways are looking into what caused one of it aircrafts to catch fire. it happened during maintenance check. the fire started in a small motor under the plane's trail. no one was aboard at the time. the plane was scheduled to fly to vancouver. passengers were put on another airplane craft two hours later. >>> there's word that mcafee is spending christmas in england. the pioneer wrote that he's safe in the country where he grew up. mcafee was born in england. the sun reports mcafee is hoping for a fresh start. mcafee has been in hiding from authorities in belize where he had been living. he is wanted for questioning in the death -- for the suspicious death of a neighbor. >>> ktvu's robert handa followed the mail carriers on their rout today. >> reporter: it's not exa
what a deal. >> here is something. >> we can get more of these. >> it's down to a science now. >> can we do this. >> 34. >> 25 now. >> a girl would be happy with a pink monkey. >> we keep track of them by age, by year. >> two, one, yay. >> the gifts we give out are from infants to 13 years old. last year we probably had 15 carts loaded up with gifts. you people are so awesome we really appreciate this. >> the kids just love meeting santa. >> he's so excited to meet santa claus right now. >> come meet santa. >> hohoho, merry christmas. >> the family gets their picture taken with santa. >> big smiles, there you go. >> merry christmas. >> are you going to ask me what i want for christmas. >> what do you want for christmas? >> a monster truck, a real one. >> we have probably about 500 children. >> we started out with five right now. >> my grandma is a go getter. she just loves what she does and she's so good at it. it's just part of her personality that's how it's gotten where it's reached where it has. >> good job pedro. >> thank you. >> we came out here the first year to do santa and i
. part of what the problem has been, political sciences have shown it's a myth. the nra defeated the democratic party, when the democratic party pushed in 2004 or 1994 for the assault weapons ban. studies have shown since then it's not at all clear that that vote was what cost the democrats the leadership of the house of representatives, and i think if democrats are strong and if republicans are strong, one of the things that polls consistently show, is that the american people generally and the membership of the nra believe in things like licensing requirements, more rigorous background checks. not having this loophole for private gun shows where convicted felons can go and buy guns without a background check. those are reasonable measures, it's the leadership of the nra -- if members of congress can see that, we can get somewhere. >> why haven't we chimed in to help with the discussion. because some have been waiting for the nra to speak. >> i don't see the republicans joining in with the democrats on almost anything these days. i'm not sure this is different from anything else
. >> there is science and magic involved. it's quite fascinating. >> we kind of come to the end of it all. >> yeah, you are right. one of the last time zones. >> with hawaii the last. >> hawaii the last. >> tony said it, norad will be tracking him and there is a web site to go to. >> gps is great. they can track santa. >> we will talk to them during the 9:00 hour. there is their web site. they will track him a little bit later -- has he already started. >> he is fuji heading for -- >> he already started. >> wow. >> they have the number of gifts delivered. >> i don't know how they know that. >> there you go, kennedys, that's the answer. merry christmas to you. if you have a question you want answered, go to myfoxdc.com and click on the weather tab. >> so exciting. >> i love it. >>> we will see if there is excitement happening on the roadways. let's check in with jeff. >> if we were checking norad, we would see more activity than on the road. prince george's county, nothing like looking at a sunrise in a black and white camera. light volume around the beltway in both directions. over to the wilson bridge
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
at the urban institute, and alisha coleman- jensen jensen, a social science fellow at the usda. i want to show this map, which might surprise people. virginia, maryland, pennsylvania, new york, they have less food insecurity. in the deep south, states like georgia, alabama, mississippi, texas and in california, there is more food insecurity. why? guest: there is regional variation, ranging from a low of 8% to a high of 19%. research has shown there are factors for households within the state, and also factors like economic conditions at the state level and state policies that affect food insecurity. the poverty rate in the unemployment rate varies across states, the level of education berries and other factors such as region varies, and other factors such as participation in food programs varies. the cost of housing, the average wages -- all of these factors affect food insecurity. host: susan, dayton, ohio. good morning. caller: i really admire the program and an emphasis on nutritious food, and i was wondering if there were any thoughts going toward that same thing with the snap program. gue
his nose so bright? well, science has an answer. it's red all right. we will share it with you ahead. ♪ rudolph the red nosed reindeer. you'll go down in history. ♪ with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purche, everday! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great sinesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're
, cruise ship on its side in the water. well, now think about the advances made in science. some of them dazzle the eye. john zarrella counts down the top ten. >> reporter: at number ten a revolutionary camera called litro. >> it is such a powerful technology breakthrough that this will forever change how we all take inexperienced pictures. >> reporter: the camera captures the entire light field allowing the picture's focus and perspective to be changed after it's been taken. number nine, nasa's dawn spacecraft sent back staggering data about an asteroid 325 miles in diameter called vesta. it appears vesta went through some stages of planetary evolution. it's one of a kind in the solar system. >> what's clear to us is that vesta appears to be the only intact proto planet that's left. >> reporter: number eight. you may have heard the term god particle. scientists call it higsbosin. the european nuclear research corporation claims to have found it. why is it a big deal? think big bang theory. >> and this particle we think was in fact a particle like this was the fuse that set off the explo
science? >> not only that we actually lose ten years. >> reporter: the downside of turning off a variety of experiments is what? >> we've killed innovation. because the most innovative projects are the projects that will go first. >> reporter: the pending budget cuts have also forced labs to slow down the hiring of promising younger scientists. >> turning them down because i have to say to them, in all honesty, i don't know whether i can take you on on that four to five year commitment. >> reporter: the nih hopes to restore the lost 10% if the agency's funding restored but this is one danger from the fiscal cliff that isn't waiting for new year's day. the reduction in medical experiments and the hold on laboratory jobs is happening now. wyatt andrews, cbs news, washington. >>> 5:04 now. some of them don't even know it yet but dozens of former california prison inmates got pardons for christmas. governor brown issued the pardons to 79 convicted felons who have done their full-time and have been -- time and have been crime free now for more than a decade. they include ken benedict who got
. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital shapes creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanke
. we look at the major advances in science and technology. "newsroom" starts now. good morning. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello wishing you and yours a very merry christmas. we begin this hour with pope benedict using his annual christmas message to speak about the hope for peace even in the most difficult times and situations. just hours ago the 85-year-old pope spoke before a crowd in st. peter's square and to millions of others watching around the world he says even in syria, a nation embroiled in a nearly two-year long civil war, peace is possible. >> translator: may peace bring for the people of syria, deeply wounded and divided by a conflict which does not spare even the defenseless and reaps innocent victims. once again, i appeal for an end to the bloodshed. easier access for the relief of refugees and the displaced and dialogue in the pursuit of a political solution to the conflict. >> the pope also spoke out against violence against christians in nigeria and wrapped up his address by delivering christmas greetings in 65 languages. >>> in bethlehem peop
care about the science and less about the politics. >> do the -- does the specter of any type of price controls for pharmaceuticals, is that on the horizon for this country, or are we -- will we still lead the world in innovation because we won't -- we're not stupid enough to try to figure prices there? >> that's a leading question. >> it is. >> but the one major explicit price control mechanism in obama care is called an ipad board. and i can't -- i cannot remember this early hour what that stands for. but that one is -- if there's going to be anything that's overturned, it will be the ipad board. neither democrats nor republicans like it. it's -- the board, the -- >> independent payment -- >> thank you. the death panel so to speak. but it looks like it's -- >> you agree with me that the innovation has been stifled by not being able to charge what it takes to develop the drug, right? >> well, innovation is a funny thing. it's not necessarily dollar to dollar. i mean, sometimes you can just drop a soda in a -- you know, a petri dish and get penicillin like fleming did. >> that's not th
of the arts in favor of science, in favor of technology but it strikes me that what you just said and the context of the book and the fact that we still have the sort of need for the untold stories for the dark secrets is indicative of a kind of historical illiteracilliterac y that exists in our country and that african-americans and that black history in africana history itself with the subject that is most unknown or he raced from our collective consciousness. do you think that historical illiteracy contributes to our present and even to our future? do you see the larger story that you tell here as essential to your vision of the country we ought to live in? >> i don't know that i have thought about it in that way. what i definitely thought about was how reflective her family was of the american story and i wanted very much to imbue it with the history so that people could see that her family had front row seats to some of the most important moments in our history slavery, civil war emancipation, the migration, jim crow, the depression and that all their steps forward and steps
or gay rights or whatever. even in the medical sciences, there is discrimination. so it turns out that more women die of heart disease now than all cancers combined. more women die of heart disease rather than men. more women than men die of heart disease. did you know that? i just was so shocked by some of these statistics. >> i didn't know some of these until i researched for this interview, and i saw why you were so strong about it. it's startling. >> 50 years of research have been done on men. i'll tell you a funny story too. you realize how powerful females are, that even in the research, a woman doctor discovered how to grow a heart from stem cells in a petri dish, whatever. how did she do it? you know how she did it? with only female stem cells because, literally, the male stem cells got lost. and they refused to ask for directions. this is true. can you imagine that? so i just believe breast cancer has done such an amazing job raising millions and millions and millions of dollars to help that disease. let's say 39,520 women died of breast cancer in the last couple of years
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we've talked a lot about the gun culture in this country since sandy hook and up until now we haven't come to any conclusions about how to stop gun violence in america. not hard to understand, we live in two americas, one that believes owning a gun is a god-given right and one that believes owning a gun comes with a price, sometimes a tragic price. few years ago i sat down with two men who represent those two americas, one in baltimore, maryland, and the other at rural western pennsylvania. donte barksdale runs on faith. >> i'm going to take a little walk. >> reporter: an ex-con, long fought to end gun violence. according to the brady campaign to prevent gun violence there were more than 97,000 people shot in america this year, more than 250 each day. we like our guns in america. we love our guns in america. don't we? >> in the urban parts of the city, you know they tell us the biggest guy, the guy who has the most people are afraid of, the guy with the biggest gun, this is what a man is. safe streets. we're all we got. >> r
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> good morning, him ecarol costello. it's 30 minutes past the hour. time to check our top stories. we're 30 seconds away from the start of trading at the new york stock exchange. representatives from the new york national guard are ringing the opening bell today. [ bell ringing ] more than 4,000 guards and airmen helped the victims of superstorm sandy. investors are still concerned about the looming fiscal cliff. >>> blizzard warning in up to six states. in arkansas the national guard has been called to provide ambulance service for residents. heavy snow and strong winds will lead to whiteout conditions across the ohio river valley. the heaviest snow is expected to move into western pennsylvania and new york state this afternoon. >>> hundreds of american families wanting to adopt russian children may have their dreams dashed. they have given final approval for a ban on such adoptions, seen as payback for a recently signed u.s. law imposing travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>>
to understand there is no established science right now to determine whether or not a gene will predispose someone to violent behavior. i mean that's the first thing. this is a very complicated situation. people have genes. they don't always predispose or actually turn into a specific problem. and in this case if someone were to be found to have a gene, and this is a needle in a haystack, it might give some clues as to whether or not someone might or, other people might be predisposed to this kind of crime. heather: this would be a first of a kind study or a first of a kind research to >> again, there have been studies that have been done on violent offenders, and previously and we have gotten some body of evidence that helped us to determine whether this is a problem. where it is more established, where we're doing genetic testing where it is incredibly value in determining predisposing conditions such as taysak's disease or whether someone ends up with sickle cell anemia. whether someone is predisposed to alzheimer's or cancer it gets controversial and this particular probably the most c
gifts but others say they have it down to a science. >> make it in, say you that don't want it and they exchange it or -- they usually give you store credit. they won't give you money back. >> don't take it back, that's rude, just give it to someone else. >> may work. other people say instead of trading something they donate their unwanted gifts to charity. >> stanford fans headed to this year's rose ball game to see the cardinals battle wisconsin. the stadium is having a face lift but the big project is taking longer than expected. project managers say it's not going to be finished until 2015. >>> san jose state will play in the military bowl. it'll face bowling green. a team that ranks 7th in the nation. experts prwill come away with the win. the military bowl is set to kick off tomorrow at noon. >> should be a lot of fun. we are keeping track on the traffic. we understand there is caltrain delays. >> up to an hourlong and this is because of a system wide mechanical failure. trains in the north and southbound direction are impacted. we have a lot of spin outs in the s
ruled out any gun fire. they believe the sound of large science falling over may have led people to report shots fired. >> you start thinking the worst thing that can happen. i imagine someone with a gun or just -- someone coming to the store and threatening us. >> we hid behind the jewelry counter and then -- we need to get out of here. i'm not going to get shot. >> i immediately called my mom and just wanted to talk to her. >> reporter: even after it was over and the mall reopened it was hard for many to catch their breath. >> just never know what could happen. >> sacramento police released these photographs of the two adults they say caused the disturbance. the 19-year-old and 18-year-old -- his name and photograph weren't released because he is a minor. >> a mailman at the center of a scandal. what is happening. >> and it was targeted by arsonists. >> walnut creek police still on the screen of an officer involved shooting. we will have the latest. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i to
becomes a reality. >> reporter: a harsh reality but one with some science behind it. last year, researchers of sanford university found out once participants were introduced to their future self, they were more likely to save. sounds good in theory but not experts agree it will actually work in practice. >> i'm not actually sure a stark financial physical picture is exactly what they need in order to compel them to action. >> reporter: with more americans retiring later in life and the cost of living going up, experts say two-thirds of boomers will not have enough saved to maintain their standard of live, if they can retire at all. whether or not it will actually inspire people to take action, it certainly gets you thinking. >> it does inspire me to save for retirement, absolutely. >> reporter: now, a big thank you to our brave guinea pig, the 2,000 people who logged on to view this app, unclear how many have been spurred as we heard a lot about new year's resolutions right around the corner, if they get to the new year and decide this was scary enough to get them to start savi
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